Meraj’s (must have) N95 applications

2. February 2008 at 21:44
Meraj’s (must have) Nokia N95 applications! – Part 1

Welcome to the Part 1 of my must have N95 applications, some of them aren’t really must have, but I am writing a little bit about everything that is installed in my Nokia N95-1. I will try explain this to the low-profile end-user N95 users the best I can, it is time that only fanatics use the Symbians to the maximum.

This is obviously not the first applications list made by a phone article blogger, but it is my first, so just sit back and relax while I review the applications that I use.

In this edition you will read about:

  • Epocware Handy Taskman
  • Samir’s RotateMe
  • Samir’s Nokmote
  • Nokia Activity Monitor
  • MXit
  • Minispeaker

Handy Taskman review

Taskman from Epocware is most definitely the most useful application in my phone. It does the simple but very useful job that the computer task manager does, totally adapted to a mobile phone display. The very important feature of the application is to kill applications that do not respond, instead of just terminating them.

The application also features auto-start, display of RAM, Device memory, and Memory card space available with images instead of just numbers.

Taskman also includes time and date display, and a recently opened programs section. It also gives you the option to search an application by inputting letters, the same way you search contacts.

 

 

 

What Epocware says:

Be in full control of your smartphone with Handy Taskman easy and quick!

  • Find and start the desired application by typing the first letters of its name.

  • Create shortcuts in the Favorites list to start applications, call or send SMS to the Contacts with just one click.

  • Run Handy Taskman by pressing and holding Menu button (like the built-in Task manager).

  • Get full information about running programs and free memory left on the phone (RAM, Phone memory and Memory card).

  • Switch to, Close, Kill any application or Close them all in one click.

Download

RotateMe review

This is one of most striking, useful and impressive applications that a phone can have. It is really simple though, but Samir has made it comprehensively packed with useful features.

For those that don’t know it yet, RotateMe changes the phone from landscape to portrait depending on the position that it is at.

Although this application was at a beta phase for long, when it was launched in its Beta 5, it included the following options:

  • Sensitivity

  • Reactivity

  • AutoStart

  • Inactivity delay

  • Priority

  • System Application

  • Hidden Application (not working well)

The best thing about it is that it won’t be active if the phone is locked or if you are in a call. It does hide the application but you just have to set it hidden everytime in order for it to do that.

Many features have been upgraded and improved in the newer releases, but unfortunately I haven’t donated, so I am not aware of them.

I suggest you do go to www.bysamir.fr and donate few Euros and get hold of this wonderful application.

From the developer’s website:

N95 only

  • Auto rotation: when you turn your device, the screen automatically rotates.
    Watch a demo video

Other compatible devices

  • Rotate with hotkey: Press ‘Edit’ + ‘Dial’ to switch between landscape and portrait modes.

  • Rotate by launching: Launch the application to rotate the screen. (as on nokia E60)

All devices

  • New User Interface

  • System application: Prevent automatic closing of rotateMe by system in case of low memory.

  • Launch at startup: rotateMe will be automatically launched at the phone boot.

 

 

Nokmote review


I did donate for this application the moment I saw the video. I thought it was completely awesome, and it would be great to show off the powers of the Nokia N95 (call me whatever names you want, I don’t care).

This is another simple program if you look it at a theoretical aspect. When you tilt the phone on a certain direction, it sends an message to the OS to act as a navigational key, this works on five ways, that is four directions and a joystick press.

Here are two videos of the application:

http://dailymotion.alice.it/video/x3f4o8_nokmote_tech

http://www.dailymotion.com/relevance/search/nokmote/video/x3ne5f_nokmote-in-action_tech

I don’t advise it to use as a web browsing tool or any other form or browsing, either contacts or even music as it is highly sensitive. Another application is on its way that does the same job as Nokmote, but it’s more controlled in that matter. The only real use that the program has is for gaming, and that too in landscape mode, unless you connect it to a TV, but for that you rather have a Nintendo Wii.

I suggest you donate to Samir and get hold of it:

http://www.bysamir.fr/nokmote/

 

Nokia Activity Monitor review

This is one of those applications that switch on at 7am and switch it off late at night. Because it works with the built in accelerometer, it can be used as a pedometer as well, some clever Nokia researchers managed to get all the code right, and the application works almost accurately.

When I get home I know approximately how many steps I walked, how many calories I lost (not many) and how many kilometres I’ve done.

Unfortunately the application doesn’t interact with Wellness diary so that data has to be manually entered there.

There are many types of graphs, weekly views, and the application itself lets you rotate it to landscape mode, lock the keypad or even send it to background.

You can download it here:

http://research.nokia.com/projects/activity_monitor

 

 

 

 

Minispeaker (mini)review

Nothing really fancy in here, in fact, I really don’t know where I got if from and there is no “about” section in the application so I cannot tell you where did it come from.

If you have any latest OS9.2 Symbian, you will notice that it says in the “phone’s” voice a caller’s name when there is an incoming call. What this program simply does it use that same voice to convert any text you write into sound. The problem with this is that the voice appears to be French, and I write in either Portuguese or English, so it really doesn’t help me having Inspector Jacques Closeau dictating to me (no offence to the French).

Download from: Google?

 

Original article